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NSW Syllabuses

Stage Statements

Stage statements are summaries of the knowledge, understanding, skills, values and attitudes that have been developed by students as a result of achieving the outcomes for the relevant Stage of learning.

Prior-to-school learning

Students bring to school a range of knowledge, understanding and skills developed in home and prior-to-school settings. The movement into Early Stage 1 should be seen as a continuum of learning and planned for appropriately.

The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia describes a range of opportunities for students to learn and develop a foundation for future success in learning.

The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia has five Learning Outcomes that reflect contemporary theories and research evidence concerning children’s learning. The outcomes are used to guide planning and to assist all children to make progress.

The outcomes are:

  1. Children have a strong sense of identity.
  2. Children are connected with and contribute to their world.
  3. Children have a strong sense of wellbeing.
  4. Children are confident and involved learners.
  5. Children are effective communicators.

In addition, teachers need to acknowledge the learning that children bring to school, and plan appropriate learning experiences that make connections with existing language and literacy development, including language used at home.

Early Stage 1

By the end of Early Stage 1, students identify familiar places and recognise why some places are special or important to people and how they care for them. They recognise that places can be represented on maps.

Students acquire information by observing, talking to others and viewing, reading and/or listening to texts. They use geographical tools and communicate geographical information in a range of forms. Students reflect on their learning from the findings of their inquiry.

Stage 1

By the end of Stage 1, students describe the natural features of different places, including the weather and seasons, and recognise that places exist across a range of scales. They describe human features of places, including how spaces can be arranged for different purposes. Students investigate how places are managed and cared for and discuss the connections people have to different places.

Students pose questions and collect and record information to answer these questions. They represent data in tables and on maps. They interpret geographical information to draw conclusions. Students present findings in a range of communication forms using simple geographical terms. They reflect on their learning and suggest actions in response to the findings of their inquiry.

Stage 2

By the end of Stage 2, students examine the characteristics of places in different locations from the local to the national scale. They describe interconnections between people and the environment. They identify simple patterns in the distribution of the features of places. Students recognise the importance of the environment and examine how different perceptions influence people’s responses to a geographical challenge.

Students develop geographical questions to investigate and collect and record relevant data and information to answer these questions. They represent data by constructing tables and graphs and maps featuring cartographic conventions. They read maps to determine location, direction and distance. Students interpret data and draw conclusions. They present findings using geographical terminology in a range of communication forms. They reflect on their learning and propose individual action in response to a local geographical challenge and identify the expected effects of their proposed action.

Stage 3

By the end of Stage 3, students describe the diverse characteristics of places in different locations across local and global scales. They explain interactions between people, places and environments and identify factors influencing interconnections. Students compare spatial distributions and patterns among phenomena. They explore how people respond to a geographical challenge and investigate reasons for differing perspectives.

Students develop geographical questions to frame an inquiry. They use a variety of strategies to locate, collect and record relevant data and information to answer inquiry questions. They represent data in different forms. Students interpret data and other information to identify and compare spatial distributions, patterns and trends, infer relationships and draw conclusions. They present findings and ideas using geographical terminology in a range of communication forms. They propose solutions, and may take action in response to a geographical challenge and describe the expected effects of their proposal.

Stage 4

By the end of Stage 4, students describe geographical processes that influence the features and characteristics of places and environments across a range of scales. They describe how places are perceived and valued differently and explain interconnections within environments and between people, places and environments. Students investigate environmental change and differences in human wellbeing and discuss strategies for addressing geographical challenges, taking into account environmental, economic and social factors.

Students undertake geographical inquiry to build knowledge and understanding of people, places and environments through the collection, collation and analysis of primary data and secondary information. Students propose explanations for spatial distributions, patterns and trends and infer relationships. They propose solutions, and may take action to address contemporary geographical challenges and predict outcomes. Students participate in fieldwork to collect primary data and develop their personal capabilities and workplace skills.

Stage 5

By the end of Stage 5, students explain geographical processes that change features and characteristics of places and environments over time and across scales and explain the likely consequences of these changes. They analyse interconnections between people, places and environments and propose explanations for distributions, patterns and spatial variations over time and across scales. Students compare changing environments, analyse global differences in human wellbeing, explore alternative views to geographical challenges and assess strategies to address challenges using environmental, social and economic criteria.

Students undertake geographical inquiry to extend knowledge and understanding, and make generalisations and inferences about people, places and environments through the collection, analysis and evaluation of primary data and secondary information. They propose explanations for significant patterns, trends, relationships and anomalies in geographical phenomena. Students propose solutions, and may take action to address contemporary geographical challenges, taking into account alternative points of view and predicted outcomes. Students participate in relevant fieldwork to collect primary data and enhance their personal capabilities and workplace skills.